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Badminton Horse Trials & Chepstow 2*

VennootChepstow

It has been a busy few weeks for all of us at Davison Equestrian with Chepstow 2*, Badminton Horse Trials and Windsor Horse show next week!

Joe and Vennoot had a successful show at Chepstow International 2* with a win in the big tour and great rounds from the younger horses.
Below is an excerpt from British Showjumping press release.

Joe Davison claimed the big tour two phase with recent acquisition Vennoot II, a 12-year-old owned by Gillian Davison who will be aimed at Nations Cup teams and world ranking classes. “He needed plenty of flatwork, but he’s got a good brain and wants to learn” said Joe, who can rely on his father, dressage supremo Richard Davison, for tips.


Richard Davison talks to Jonty Evans at Badminton Horse Trials 2014
It’s the final day of Badminton Horse Trials which has well and truly reminded the equestrian world that it is back as one of the toughest 4* events going.Richard and Tom headed down on Friday to see the second day of dressage and catch up with our partners such as Gatehouse Hats above and Dodson & Horrell that keep us at the top of our game. Richard spent time answering your dressage questions on the Mark Todd Collection stand. Look out for your question and answer on the MT Facebook page soon!Come evening, drinks and celebrations were in order. Carl Hester and Orion Books hosted the launch of Carl’s autobiography, “Making it happen”, Richard has already had a sneak preview and it’s sure be a great read about the memoirs of the man from Sark.
Hannes van het Bruggeveld
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Latest news & results from Valencia

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Tweets from https://twitter.com/davison37140880/davison-dressage
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Developing you medium & extended trot out in the field with Richard & Tom Davison.

Trotting up hills is a great way to teach your horse to open up his shoulders, and will help him understand what he’s supposed to do.

Medium and extended trot both have to be mastered if you want to go up the levels in dressage. And it’s easier than you think.

Some horses can naturally lengthen their stride, so if yours is one of them, then when you’re preparing to ride your first Novice test (where medium trot is required for the first time), you shouldn’t have much trouble.

Others may need a bit more help, but you should find that most horses will happily oblige once they understand what you’re asking them to do.

But before you start to teach your horse how to lengthen his trot stride, here’s a reminder of what the trot is and how the horse should move in trot.

The trot: defined
The trot is a two-time pace where the horse moves his legs in diagonal pairs, plus there’s a moment of suspension when all four legs are off the ground.

Ideally – and essentially at the higher levels – the horse should work in good, uphill balance with his hindlegs stepping well under his body. He should be supple through his topline and seeking a rein contact.

If your horse’s trot doesn’t feel up to scratch, don’t panic. Here are some common trot problems we encounter, with some simple solutions, too. I find they work well for my horses, so give them a go.

The hills are alive
If you have access to a long, not- too-steep hill, then use it to your advantage.

Take a light seat, but don’t give the rein away, and don’t allow your horse to fall onto the forehand.

You should find your horse naturally reaches with his stride more than he would on flat ground, so encourage him.

Or if you have a friend who has a horse with an established medium trot, trot up the hill beside them and watch your horse really open up!

In conjunction with Horse&Rider Magazine.

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Trot poles for building on your horse's medium & extended trot by Richard & Tom Davison

Trot poles can help you build a blockbuster medium and extended trot, says Richard Davison

Pole work, used with care, is a great way to persuade a horse to lengthen his stride. However, use poles carefully because you need to ensure you don’t overdo things too soon, as this can knock a horse’s confidence.

Note It’s crucial to have someone on the ground to help you with pole work and raised pole work for horses.

Use square poles rather than round ones, as they won’t roll if your horse stand on one.

Picture

Tom & Egano Star over raised trot poles

Trot poles
Start with three poles set approximately 1.3m (4.5ft) apart, although you will need to adapt the distances to suit your horse.

Ride over the poles several times, on both reins, and once your horse is completely comfortable with the distance, ask your helper to roll them out, just an inch at a time, until your horse has to reach a little to make the next distance.

However, I can’t stress enough how important it is to do this gradually and not to overdo the distances.

Build on this exercise by raising one end of the poles onto small blocks, as shown here. This helps the horse to develop more cadence and lift in his trot, so you get a flashy, not flat, medium trot.

In conjunction with Horse&Rider Magazine.

Author: Tom Davison
Email: info@davisonequestrian.com

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Trot poles for building on your medium & extended trot by Richard Davison

Trot poles can help you build a blockbuster medium and extended trot, says Richard DavisonPole work, used with care, is a great way to persuade a horse to lengthen his stride. However, use poles carefully because you need to ensure you don’t overdo things too soon, as this can knock a horse’s confidence.Note It’s crucial to have someone on the ground to help you with pole work.Use square poles rather than round ones, as they won’t roll if your horse stand on one.

miloTrotPoles
Tom & Egano Star
Trot poles
Start with three poles set approximately 1.3m (4.5ft) apart, although you will need to adapt the distances to suit your horse.
Ride over the poles several times, on both reins, and once your horse is completely comfortable with the distance, ask your helper to roll them out, just an inch at a time, until your horse has to reach a little to make the next distance.However, I can’t stress enough how important it is to do this gradually and not to overdo the distances.Build on this exercise by raising one end of the poles onto small blocks, as shown here. This helps the horse to develop more cadence and lift in his trot, so you get a flashy, not flat, medium trot.

In conjunction with Horse&Rider Magazine.